Urban Decay launches collection with artist Jean-Michel Basquiat

Urban Decay launches collection with artist Jean-Michel Basquiat

Urban Decay launches a new beauty collaboration for summer 2017 – with the work of the late, great American artist, Jean-Michel Basquiat as its design and colour inspiration.

The collection has a great range of eyeshadow palettes, limited edition lipsticks, blush palette, eye liners and 3 very chic cosmetics bags to keep it all in. If you are feeling very flush there’s also a limited edition UD Vault which contains the whole collection. The collection is available from late April.

Ruby Rose fronts the line – not without controversy – see more below:

 

Urban Decay Summer 2017 Jean-Michel Basquiat Collection

Tenant Eyeshadow Palette – Limited Edition
Studio – pale pink matte
1960 – bright pink matte
Neo – rich aubergine with micro-shimmer
Les – charcoal-black matte-satin
Graffiti – deep metallic green
Exu – bright green shimmer
Boom – bright teal matte
Untitled – rich deep blue matte

Gold Griot Eyeshadow Palette – Limited Edition

Enigma – neutral pale nude matte

Levitation – warm pale nude matte
Not for Sale – medium sienna matte
Suckerpunch – warm brown shimmer
Influence – brown satin wtih gold shimmer
BK – gray matte-satin
Pseudonym – deep navy matte
Crown – very metallic gold

Gallery Blush Palette – Limited Edition
X-Rated – medium pink
Now’s The Time – gold-champagne shimmer
Jawbone – medium bronze
NOHO – radiant berry

Vice Lipstick – Limited Edition
Abstract – nude-taupe (Cream)
Epigram – neutral sienna (Cream)
Exhibition – medium pink-purple (Comfort Matte)

24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil – Limited Edition
Post Punk – bright neon green with a hint of pearl
Anatomy – sienna matte
Vivid – bright teal matte
Cosmetic Bag – Limited Edition

Gallery Cosmetic Bag

1983 Cosmetic Bag

Untitled Cosmetic Bag

UD Jean-Michel Basquiat Vault – Limited Edition

Part of the UD Jean-Michel Basquiat collection, this Vault contains the entire Basquiat makeup collection.

To get a better understanding of the thought process behind the collection, the Cut spoke with David Stark, president of Artestar, the creative firm that has managed the licensing of Basquiat’s work for nearly 20 years.

How did the collection with Urban Decay come to fruition?

As a company we’re routinely going out to find interesting ways to bring artists into the cultural mainstream. Someone like Jean-Michel has been deceased for a long time and it’s important for us to keep his profile high and find good, relevant ways of bringing him into the cultural landscape. When we think about a program we try and figure out who the right fit would be and vehicles that would be a good platform for us to get our message out. Urban Decay is a company we’ve known for several years. It took us a little bit of time to craft the program we eventually developed with them, but we did feel that as a brand Urban Decay is edgy and had an element of artistry and felt like a good fit.

It’s important for us to keep his profile high and find good, relevant ways of bringing him into the cultural landscape.
Who approached whom?

We approached them about three years ago. The actual collaboration took about a year to come together after we initially met.

What was the estate’s role in the collaboration?

With any licensing programs that we develop, we’re granting a certain set of rights, but we have a very strict approval process. In most cases we pick the right company and we have a good perspective on why we’re working with them. We have a pretty easy time creating the assets and going to market. That said, we work very closely with them in developing the final products. We have a product developer in-house that works with the brands that we work with. We also have a brand strategist that helps put together the concepts so we’re very strategic about how we put the programs together.

Ruby Rose is a noted fan of Basquiat’s work. Did you select her to represent the collection, or was it a coincidence?

As far as I know it was a coincidence. I think it was a happy coincidence for Ruby Rose. She was personally very thrilled that Urban Decay had selected Basquiat to do an activation with.
We like the idea of introducing Basquiat to a new audience and a new generation. This is a way for us to get out in a very public way and engage people with his art and hopefully get them to do a little research and learn something about Basquiat. The other thing is, there are plenty of people, when it comes to beauty, who are not necessarily the museum-going audience. There may be a consumer from Urban Decay who never steps foot in a museum and this is a subversive way of getting Basquiat into different people’s eyeballs that they wouldn’t necessarily see otherwise. Basquiat was a great communicator and this is a way for that art to get out and communicate on a different plane.

With thanks to The Cut.

 

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